WWW.SA.I-PDF.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Abstracts, books, theses
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:   || 2 |

«NZTA Drama: Road safety Year 9 and 10 Lesson Plans Lesson plans selected from learning experiences in the NZTA Drama unit plan. Context: This series of ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

NZTA Drama: Road safety

Year 9 and 10 Lesson Plans

Lesson plans selected from learning experiences in the NZTA Drama unit plan.

Context: This series of lessons allow students to meet achievement objectives at Level 5 of The Arts to help students

develop conceptual understanding around creating works and responding to the works of others, in the context of

messages about road safety.

http://education.nzta.govt.nz/resources/secondary-school-curriculum-resources

NOTE: Teachers should be aware that this unit may involve the discussion of road crashes. It is likely there will be students in your class with first-hand experience of such issues, and discretion is advised. It is recommended that students are forewarned of the topic prior to the start of the unit, and that every effort is made to take students’ individual circumstances into account.1. Using MIME to refine and communicate ideas – [Context: Road Safety] Watch: examples of performance using mime – observe movement, elements, conventions and techniques used in mime.

Identify (label) the elements, conventions and techniques used in Mime: e.g.

Describe the elements, conventions and techniques used in Mime: e.g.

Explain (give reasons for) the elements, conventions and techniques used in Mime e.g.

Warm Up:

All students should be sitting on the floor in their own space. Teacher prompts the following separate mime activities.

1. Imagine reading the road code, studying hard, trying to memorise certain answers – try to see the colours in the print, the size of the road code and what you are actually reading

2. Stand up and walk slowly around the room, you have the car keys in your hand. Stop, you suddenly drop the keys and they fall to the ground. Pick them up, but as you do so you notice $20.00 under the car so you need to crawl under the car and get the money

3. Fill your car up with petrol and clean the windows at the service station

4. You are about to leave when you notice your car has a flat tyre – change the tyre. You are really annoyed that this has happened and may be late for your meeting

5. Wash your car – see the shape, design, colour – wax it if you have time. You love washing your car and making it shine!

Ask students to get into pairs. One student needs to be A and the other B. The following scenarios are to be in mime, using no words, only physical communication and movement.

1. A = Teaching B how to drive/B = learning how to drive but super confident and thinks they know everything – A gets very frustrated with B

2. A = is driving out of control and drives onto the pavement, stopping suddenly. B = is walking along the pavement and witnesses A almost crashing. B runs to see if all is okay – what happens?

As a class discuss emotions. What are emotions? Examples could be: Happy, sad, frustrated, angry, annoyed, excited. Ask the class if anyone has r witnessed a really close call on the roads– what happened, allow the class to share some of their experiences.

Activity:

In groups of 4-5 students are to create a mime, representing a story from the list provided or they may make up their own scenario (this could also be based on a real story). The mime should last approx 1-2 minutes but must have a clear storyline (strong beginning, middle and end). Allow students at least 10-15 minutes to plan their scene and to develop characters. The scene should convey a sense of some emotion. Allow each group to perform their mime to the class.

Possible Scenarios:

• Feeling unsafe in the car as a passenger – what can you do?

• Learning to drive – what is important?

• First time driving alone – what would that be like?

• How to give a friend advice when they are making bad choices whilst driving, walking or cycling

• Avoiding distractions and dangers when out for a walk

• Keeping safe when cycling on city streets or country roads

• See a car almost crash on the road – what happened?

• Looking for and avoiding hazards when driving

• Experiencing making a mistake when driving – having a close call, what happens from there?

• Driving around on the weekends with friends – what can happen?

• Friends talking and laughing in the car – loss of concentration, what can go wrong?

• Having parents who are really bad drivers – what do you do, how do you help?

• People who don’t put their safety belts on

Reflection:

Discuss the performances as a class and highlight mime that was effective and convincing. Discuss aspects of mime, body movement to be aware of to ensure a strong performance.

2. Using RADIO DRAMA to refine and communicate ideas – [Context: Road Safety] Listen to examples of performance using Radio Drama – note the elements, conventions and techniques used in radio plays.

Examples:

http://www.radionz.co.nz/podcasts/drama/youmenow.rss http://toolselector.tki.org.nz/r/arts/drama/radio/index_e.php Identify (label) the elements of Radio Drama: e.g. Role, time, place, action, tension, focus.

Describe the elements of Radio Drama.





Explain (give reasons for) the elements of Radio Drama.

Identify(label) the features of Radio Drama: e.g. Generally only a few actors, voice is critical and sound effects.

Describe the features of Radio Drama.

Explain (give reasons for) the features of Radio Drama.

Identify (label) the format for Radio Play Scripts: e.g. 1 page of dialogue is approximately 1 minute, each scene should be numbered, lines double spaced, sound and music cues are triple spaced, paragraphs are triple spaced, all cues are capitalised and numbered (cue starts at number 1 on top of each page), notes for pronunciation, physical action, and position of characters are indented, script is typed on one side so noise is reduced when reading.

Describe the format for Radio Play Scripts.

Explain (give reasons for) the format for Radio Play Scripts.

Warm Up:

Student to lie on floor with eyes closed and collectively create a sound scape.

1. Making sounds as if in a busy street

2. Traffic moving fast and speeding

3. Making the sound of an accident Discuss how we can use our voices to create an atmosphere and give meaning to a scene particularly with a Radio Play.

Activity 1:

In small groups of 4-5 students, give each group a box of items that they need to write a list and create as many sounds as possible from the items provided.

The sounds need to be related to cars, traffic, roads, travelling, moving, or crashes.

ITEMS: Glass jar, spoon, two wooden blocks, empty tin can, plastic bag, stones (you may add any other items) Groups are then to demonstrate their best two sounds to the class.

Activity 2:

In groups of 4-5, students are to make a short (1-3min) Radio Drama using voices, developing characters. There must be a clear beginning, middle and end to the story. Sound effects must be used. Scenarios may be selected from the list below, or groups may have their own idea – the scenario must be around road safety and awareness with a positive message to make healthy choices. Students will need at least 10-15 minutes to plan this (they may require more time for a more comprehensive performance).

Possible Scenarios:

• Feeling unsafe in the car as a passenger – what can you do?

• Learning to drive – what is important?

• First time driving alone – what would that be like?

• How to give a friend advice when they are making bad choices whilst driving, walking or cycling

• Avoiding distractions and dangers when out for a walk

• Keeping safe when cycling on city streets or country roads

• See a car almost crash on the road – what happened?

• Looking for and avoiding hazards when driving

• Experiencing making a mistake when driving – having a close call, what happens from there?

• Driving around on the weekends with friends – what can happen?

• Friends talking and laughing in the car – loss of concentration, what can go wrong?

• Having parents who are really bad drivers – what do you do, how do you help?

• People who don’t put their safety belts on Groups then perform their Radio Drama plays to the class. Audience should have their eyes closed to really imagine the scenario – as it is not about “watching” the performance, it is about listening.

Reflection:

Discuss the radio play as a class and highlight what was effective and convincing and gave impact to the performance.

3. Using DANCE to refine and communicate ideas – [Context: Road Safety] Observe examples of performance using dance – note the elements, conventions and techniques used in dance.

Use Dance Terminology: e.g. locomotor, non-locomotor, body base, place, range, direction, level, focus, balance, beat, time, tempo, rhythm, mirroring.

Identify (label) the use of elements of dance: e.g. Body awareness, space, time, energy, relationships, pathways, quality, shadowing, symmetry, tempo Describe the use of elements of dance.

Explain (give reasons for) the use of elements of dance.

Identify the use of choreographic devices: e.g. Augmentation, canon, embellishment, fragmentation, insertion, instrumentation, inversion, motif, repetition, retrograde.

Describe the use of choreographic devices.

Explain (give reasons for) the use of choreographic devices.

Warm Up Activities:

Empathy – Symbol a. Discuss empathy/symbol what they mean b. Discuss the significance of colour on a stage/ drama and dance c. Use coloured sheets (red, blue, green, black, white) to discuss

- What mood or emotion the colour makes you feel

- What the colour makes you think of/remind you of

For example:

Red – sirens, blood, fast, anger, frustration, hot, fire, evil White: hospital, sterile, innocence, loneliness, isolation, ice-cream, weddings, peace, calm Black: death, evil, darkness, night, cold, alone Green: go, safe, movement, nature Basic Terms for Dance/Movement a. Give them basic terms and, using music, give examples and participate as a class b. Have students copy and move in circles. Students work on 2-3 components then teach class – with music in the background

Movement Activity:

The following group activity must have a focus of road safety or vehicle awareness.

Organise students into groups 4-5 students in each group. Give each group one piece of fabric. Groups then create a movement piece which portrays one emotion that the sheet makes them feel eg; Black and a sad scene, red an emergency, green happy and on the go – but also tell a story.

Students must use the sheet in a symbolic and creative way to help them. Students are to tell a story (strong beginning, middle and end) to create a 1-2 minute performance. This will take each group at least 10-15 minutes to plan and organise (it may take longer).

Remind student this is a movement exercise so no one is able to speak. Student may incorporate mime to assist if they need to. Groups should aim to incorporate Dance elements and choreographic devices (at least 5) into their piece.

Groups can design their own story or select from the choices below.

Possible Scenarios:

• Feeling unsafe in the car as a passenger – what can you do?

• Learning to drive – what is important?

• First time driving alone – what would that be like?

• How to give a friend advice when they are making bad choices whilst driving, walking or cycling

• Avoiding distractions and dangers when out for a walk

• Keeping safe when cycling on city streets or country roads

• See a car almost crash on the road – what happened?

• Looking for and avoiding hazards when driving

• Experiencing making a mistake when driving – having a close call, what happens from there?

• Driving around on the weekends with friends – what can happen?

• Friends talking and laughing in the car – loss of concentration, what can go wrong?

• Having parents who are really bad drivers – what do you do, how do you help?

• People who don’t put their safety belts on Groups then perform their scene to the class.

Reflection:

Discuss the dance/s as a class and highlight what was effective and convincing and gave impact to the performance.

4. Using IMPROVISATION to refine and communicate ideas – [Context: Road Safety] Note: In order for Improvisation to be effective students must believe in their given scenario and situation. It is critical that they do not block (verbal/physical) when they are acting or performing. Improvisation relies on actors accepting offers from others and supporting one another on stage.

Observe examples of performance using improvisation – note the elements, conventions and techniques used in improvisation.

Identify examples of the elements conventions and techniques used in an improvisation.

Describe examples of the elements conventions and techniques used in an improvisation.

Explain (give reasons for) the examples of elements conventions and techniques used in an improvisation.

Warm Up:

Imagination exercise Everyone goes outside classroom and lines up ready to enter. Tell students that when they enter, they are to find their own space and spot on the wall (to draw/paint) – they are all ‘young designers’ with a brief to design their dream car. They are mime/improvise getting paper, pens, paint and draw/paint a picture designing the ultimate car of their choice. Students need to go over their drawing/painting twice to ensure they clearly visualize the picture. Class then sit on floor in front of their picture.

This requires absolute imagination and belief in their given situation – as the purpose is to have students visualize and complete the task as if it were real.

Teacher may ask some to stand up and show the class and explain their drawing/painting.

Teacher then asks students to pair up and explain their picture to each other (give 1-2 mins to do this).

Emotional Hitchhiker Game (theatre sports):

Place five chairs on the stage. One chair is designated for the driver. Select four students to stand on the side of stage, numbered 1-4.

All students including the driver are given an emotion that they must be/play/act. When a student enters into the car, everyone adopts their emotion. When a student leaves the car, everyone goes back to the last emotion they were acting out.

The game begins by the driver creating a scene showing their emotion and pretending to drive. The first student then steps towards the car as if hitchhiking with thumb out. The car stops and picks them up. As the student (number 1) enters the car anyone in the car adopts their given emotion (this pattern is continued until all in the car). It is critical that students converse to keep the scene ‘alive’. Once all in the car after a few seconds the last in the car (number

4) looks for a reason to leave – as they leave the emotion of the car returns to the last student’s emotion (number 3). The driver stops, lets students out and then one by one they all leave until we are left with the driver.

Possible emotions: nervous, obsessive, neurotic, shy, worried, scared, allergies, super athlete, loud, singer, model, anxious, sad, lethargic, flirtatious, grumpy, bad attitude, gangster, mad, fast talker, confident.

Example:

http://wn.com/Branson_School_TheatreSports--Hitchhiker

Activity:



Pages:   || 2 |


Similar works:

«Jazz Chants... how to use them to help your students speak more clearly, practice vocabulary, and learn and reinforce grammar patterns. Shirley Thompson ESL Consultant, Teacher Trainer Goals for this webinar: • to introduce (or re-introduce) you to Carolyn Graham’s Jazz Chants.• to show you how I introduce and practice chants in my classes • to explore a variety of ways you can use jazz chants – to help your students speak with the natural rhythm and intonation patterns of American...»

«The Limits of Master Narratives in History Textbooks: An Analysis of Representations of Martin Luther King, Jr. DERRICK P. ALRIDGE University of Georgia In this study, I argue that American history textbooks present discrete, heroic, onedimensional, and neatly packaged master narratives that deny students a complex, realistic, and rich understanding of people and events in American history. In making this argument, I examine the master narratives of Martin Luther King, Jr., in high school...»

«! “They Never Really Tried to Reach Out to Us”: Examining Identities and Confronting the Emotional Distance Between Urban Youth and Urban Schools Andrew N. McKnight, University of Alabama at Birmingham Abstract This paper looks at the perspectives of 22 young adults concerning their upbringings and life experiences, experiences in inner city and suburban schools, after leaving school, and later in a privately funded urban GED preparation facility in a large southern city. Specifically it...»

«Minnesota Conservation volunteer ng ts ou ralis Teachers Guide Yu t Na “Hundreds and Thousands and Millions of Fish” Prepared by Jack Judkins, Multidisciplinary Classroom Activities Curriculum Teachers guide for the Young Naturalists article “Hundreds and Thousands and Millions Connections of Fish” by Roland Sigurdson. Published in the July–August 2013 Minnesota Conservation Volunteer, or visit www.mndnr.gov/young_naturalists/fisheries. Minnesota Young Naturalists teachers guides are...»

«For feminist consciousness in the academy Sarah Amsler * Forthcoming in Politics and Culture (2012) I was recently invited to reflect on the conditions of women in British universities with a group of students and colleagues exploring the politics of the corporate academy. Rather than trying to speak in some hackneyed way for ‘women’, I decided to reflect on the anti-feminist nature of the neoliberal rationalities now dictating academic life within universities, and on the subversions of...»

«A TEACHER’S GUIDE TO THE SIGNET CLASSIC EDITION OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S HENRY V By JAMES E. McGINN, Ed.D and JEANNE M. McGLINN, Ph.D.SERIES EDITORS: W. GEIGER ELLIS, ED.D., UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA, EMERITUS and ARTHEA J. S. REED, PH.D., UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA, RETIRED A Teacher’s Guide to the Signet Classic Edition of William Shakespeare’s Henry V 2 AN INTRODUCTION William Shakespeare’s Henry V offers challenges and rewards to those teaching the play at the high school and...»

«Growing Up Online A Study Guide for Teachers About the Film FRONTLINE takes viewers inside the private worlds that kids are creating online, raising important questions about how the Internet is transforming the experience of adolescence. At school, teachers are trying to figure out how to reach a generation that no longer reads books or newspapers. Fear of online predators has led teachers and parents to focus primarily on keeping kids safe online. But many young people think these fears are...»

«Instructor’s Manual PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH THE UNMOTIVATED PATIENT with Erving Polster, PhD by Randall C. Wyatt, PhD & Erika L. Seid, MA PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH THE UNMOTIVATED PATIENT Psychotherapy.net The Instructor’s Manual accompanies the DVD Psychotherapy with the Unmotivated Patient (Instructor’s Version). Video available at www.Psychotherapy.net. © 2006 Psychotherapy.net, LLC. All rights reserved. Published by Psychotherapy.net Mill Valley, CA Email: contact@psychotherapy.net Phone....»

«NBER WORKING PAPER SERIES VALIDATING TEACHER EFFECT ESTIMATES USING CHANGES IN TEACHER ASSIGNMENTS IN LOS ANGELES Andrew Bacher-Hicks Thomas J. Kane Douglas O. Staiger Working Paper 20657 http://www.nber.org/papers/w20657 NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138 November 2014 We thank Raj Chetty for helpful discussions and comments. Thomas J. Kane served as an expert witness for Gibson, Dunn, and Crutcher LLP to testify in Vergara v. California....»

«Physical education and health promotion: a qualitative study of teachers' perceptions Ken Green and Miranda Thurston Ken Green is a Lecturer in the Sociology of Physical Education and Sport at the Department of Physical Education and Sports Science, Chester College of Higher Education, Chester, UK and is Editor of the European Physical Education Review. Miranda Thurston is Director of the Centre for Public Health Research in Chester, UK. Abstract Presents the findings from semi-structured...»

«Writing for Change RAISING AWARENESS OF DIFFERENCE, POWER, AND DISCRIMINATION 3.1 Understanding Pejorative Terms Objectives Identify and analyze pejorative terms. Explore attitudes surrounding the terms. Describe how the terms contribute to perpetuation of stereotypes and ineffective communication. Explore how and by whom meaning is determined. Materials needed Copies of the handout Possibly, reference materials Time needed An hour or more Instructor directions Have your students read the given...»

«Loyola University Chicago School of Law Education Law and Policy Educational Neglect: A Symptom of a Child in Crisis Introduction Any given day, educators are expected to interact with and instruct a classroom filled with 25 or more students, on average. When one of those students is absent, it may appear to make a teacher's day a bit more manageable having one less child to handle. However, there may be an underlying issue surrounding these absences. When students have frequent absences, an...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2017 www.sa.i-pdf.info - Abstracts, books, theses

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.