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«Table of Contents Table of Contents List of Tables List of Figures Appendices 1.0 INTRODUCTION 2.0 GENERAL WATERSHED INFORMATION 2.1 Plan Area 2.2 History ...»

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents

List of Tables

List of Figures

Appendices

1.0 INTRODUCTION

2.0 GENERAL WATERSHED INFORMATION

2.1 Plan Area

2.2 History and Development

2.3 Topography and Climate

2.4 Groundwater

2.5 Significant Watershed Areas

3.0 HYDROLOGY

3.1 Precipitation

3.2 Hydrometric Information

3.3 Streamflow Estimates

3.3.1 Graham Creek

3.3.1.1 Graham Lake

3.3.2 McFarlane Ditch

3.3.3 Unnamed (Repulse Point) Brook

3.3.4 Lacon Creek

3.3.5 Unnamed (Ferry) Brook

3.3.6 Unnamed (Denman Point) Brook

3.3.7 Unnamed (Northwest) Brook

3.3.8 Gladstone Creek

3.3.9 Birkenhead Creek

3.3.10 Danes Creek

3.3.11 Unnamed (Komass Bluff) Brook

3.3.12 Fillongley Creek

3.3.12.1 Chicadee Lake

3.3.13 Unnamed (Longswamps) Brook

3.3.14 Ford Creek

3.3.15 Beulah Creek

3.3.16 Other Small Drainages

3.4 Water Supply

(i)

4.0 INSTREAM FLOW REQUIREMENTS

4.1 Graham Lake Instream Requirements

4.2 Chicadee Lake Instream Requirements

5.0 WATER DEMAND

5.1 Municipal Waterworks Water Demand

5.2 Domestic Water Demand

5.3 Industrial Water Demand

5.4 Irrigation Water Demand

5.5 Storage Water Demand

5.6 Land Improvement Water Demand

5.7 Conservation Water Demand

5.8 Projected Demand

6.0 CONCLUSIONS and RECOMMENDATIONS

6.1 Graham Lake

6.2 Chickadee Lake

6.3 Municipal Waterworks

6.4 Domestic

6.5 Industrial

6.6 Irrigation

6.7 Land Improvement

6.8 Conservation

6.9 Storage

6.10 Allocation Plan Revision

List of Tables

Denman and Hornby Islands Plan Area

Watershed Areas

Graham Creek at the Mouth (08HB045) Mean Monthly Discharge

Graham Creek at the Mouth (08HB045) Unit Area Monthly Discharge

McFarlane Ditch Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge

Unnamed (Repulse Point) Brook Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge............ 12 Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge

Unnamed (Ferry) Brook Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge

Unnamed (Denman Point) Brook Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge............ 14 Unnamed (Northwest) Brook Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge.................. 14 Gladstone Creek Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge

Birkenhead Creek Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge

(ii) Danes Creek Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge

Unnamed (Komass Bluff) Brook Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge............. 16 Fillongley Creek Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge

Unnamed (Longswamps) Brook Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge............. 17 Ford Creek Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge

Beulah Creek Mean Monthly and Mean Annual Discharge

Mean Annual Discharge

Modified Tennant (Montana) Method Instream Flow Requirements

Estimated Average Annual Licenced Demand

Low Flow Licensed Demand by Drainage Area

Recommended Livestock Water Requirements

Annual Irrigation Water Requirements

List of Figures

Figure 1: Denman and Hornby Island Water Allocation Plan Area

Figure 2: Denman and Hornby Island Significant Watershed Areas

Figure 3: Denman Island Precipitation Normals

Figure 4: Graham Creek at the Mouth (08HB045)

Figure 5: Number of Water Licences

Figure 6: Licenced Water Demand

Figure 7: Irrigation Requirements

Appendices

Appendix A: Temperature and Precipitation

Appendix B: Hydrometric Data

Appendix C: Graham Lake, Chicadee Lake and McFarlane Swamp Bathometry........ 47 Appendix D: Water Licences

Appendix E: Water Licence Applications

(iii)

DENMAN & HORNBY ISLANDS WATER ALLOCATION PLAN

1.0 INTRODUCTION The Water Management Program's goals are to sustain a healthy water resource through anticipating and planning for water uses. Water Allocation Plans are a means of identifying water demands and ensuring that water use is compatible with the goals of a

sustainable environment. The advantages are:

1. Water Managements position on water allocation decisions is available to applicants and the public.

2. Response time is reduced.

3. Eliminates the need for individual studies and reports on each application.

4. Consistency of decisions are improved.

5. Specific allocation directions and decisions are defined.

6. Plans are more comprehensive.

7. Eliminates the need for referrals on individual applications.

The following regional policy was developed to provide direction:

Regional Policy:

The region shall be subdivided into watershed areas and a water allocation plan shall be prepared for each watershed area. Water licence decisions will be made in accordance with approved plans.





Assessments undertaken as part of the water allocation planning process include identifying the surface water resources available, the instream requirements for fish, the existing and potential licensable water demands and providing direction regarding further water licence allocations.

Input may be sought from other agencies. Referrals go to Federal & Provincial Fisheries agencies and to Water Management in Victoria.

–  –  –

2.1 Plan Area The Water Allocation Plan area encompasses the whole of Denman Island, Hornby Island, Sandy Island and numerous small Islets. The plan area is located off the east coast of Vancouver Island between Nanaimo and Campbell River and encompasses a total land area of 82 km2 (32 mi2). Ferries link Denman Island to Vancouver Island and Hornby Island to Denman Island for both passengers and vehicles. Figure 1 illustrates the Denman and Hornby Island Water Allocation Plan Area.

–  –  –

2.2 History and Development Denman Island is the largest of the islands within this plan area. Denman Island was used as a summer home by the indians of the Puntledge tribe whose winter homes were at Comox on Vancouver Island. Denman Island was named in 1864 after RearAdmiral The Honourable Joseph Denman, Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific Station Esquimalt from 1864 to 1867.

The first white settlement started in 1874. Denman Island had an estimated 500 residents in 1979. The lifestyle of the residents is predominantly rural residential.

Approximately 43% of the land base is within the Agricultural Land Reserve and is being actively farmed or utilized for the growth and harvesting of trees. The scarcity of water is one of the factors which limits the amount of active farming and farm production on lands devoted to farming. Crown Land makes up approximately 6% of the land base.

Hornby Island was used seasonally by the Pentlatch people of the Coast Salish group of west coast First Nations people before the onset of European settlement. In 1791 the Island was named, Isla de Lerena, by the Spaniards. It was renamed Hornby Island by the British in 1850 after Rear Admiral Phipps Hornby.

During the early 1860's Hornby Island was virtually uninhabited. By 1960 the island was inhabited by approximately 150 people; mainly fishermen, subsistence farmers and resort owners. The 1986 census reports the population of Hornby Island as

800. By 1990 the B.C. Telephone Company estimated the population to be 1,524 people.

In 1990 there were 661 small residential lots (218 vacant - 33%), 236 rural residential lots (69 vacant), 36 agricultural parcels (7 of which are mariculture), 10 commercial properties and various public use lots (ie. schools, community centre, cemetery) on Hornby Island. Land in the agricultural land reserve is 27% of the land base on Hornby Island.

2.3 Topography and Climate

Denman Island covers approximately 52 km2 (20 mi2). Denman Island is approximately 5,000 meters wide at its widest point by 18,250 meters long with its long axis lying in a northwest direction. It has a dominant ridge paralleling its west coast.

Maximum elevation is 124 m (400 feet) and minimum elevation is sea level.

Hornby Island lies to the west of Denman Island and covers approximately 30 km (12 mi2). The maximum elevation of Hornby Island is 300m (984 feet), minimum elevation is sea level.

The climate on Denman and Hornby Islands is indicated by the Canadian Climatic Normals records for the station on Denman Island for the period 1951 to 1980.

The lowest average mean daily temperature is in January and is 2.10C; with a mean daily maximum temperature of 4.40C and a mean daily minimum temperature of -0.60C.

The highest average mean daily temperature is in July and is 17.30C; with a mean daily maximum temperature of 23.40C and a mean daily minimum temperature of 11.00C.

See Appendix A for climatic normals and precipitation records for the period of 1951 to 1980.

DENMAN & HORNBY ISLANDS WATER ALLOCATION PLAN

2.4 Groundwater Denman Island groundwater was assessed in May of 1979 in a report entitled "Preliminary Review of Groundwater Conditions and Availability - Denman Island, British Columbia" by F. Chwojka of the provincial Ministry of Environment. This report contains a list of all known wells, a well location map and a watershed map for the Island, estimates of groundwater recharge and usage, and water quality. The September 1977 groundwater records indicated that there were 85 dug wells with an average depth of

4.2 metres (14 ft) and 78 drilled wells with an average depth of 40 metres (130 ft).

Further information on groundwater availability on Denman Island may be obtained from the report.

Hornby Island groundwater was assessed in October of 1984 in a report entitled "A Preliminary Review of Groundwater Conditions on Hornby Island, British Columbia" by F. Chwojka of the provincial Ministry of Environment. The 1984 groundwater records indicated that there were 73 dug wells with an average depth of 4.0 metres (13 ft) and 281 drilled wells with an average depth of 41 metres (135 ft). Further information on groundwater availability on Hornby Island may be obtained from the report and from an a further assessment entitled "Hornby Island Groundwater Pilot Project" by the provincial Ministry of Environment and anticipated to be completed by February 1994.

2.5 Significant Watershed Areas For the purpose of assessing water supplies for allocation demands, the following watershed areas were identified and the drainage areas determined. The watershed areas were measured by planimeter from 1:50,000 NTS maps. These watersheds are illustrated in Figure 2.

–  –  –

3.0 HYDROLOGY

3.1 Precipitation There is one AES precipitation station within the plan area located on Denman Island. A bar graph showing the monthly precipitation normals during the 1951 to 1980 period for these stations is shown in Figure 3. The Canadian Climatic Normals 1951data is provided in Appendix A.

The mean total annual precipitation is 1,372 mm (54.0 inches). The minimum mean monthly precipitation is 26.0 mm (1.0 inch) in July and the maximum mean monthly precipitation is 251.9 mm (9.9 inches) in January. The mean number of days with measurable precipitation is 134 days; with 128 days with rain and 9 days with snow.

Figure 3: Denman Island Precipitation Normals

3.2 Hydrometric Information There are three Water Survey Canada (WSC) hydrometric stations on Denman Island. Only one of these hydrometric stations records stream flows, namely; Graham

DENMAN & HORNBY ISLANDS WATER ALLOCATION PLAN

Creek at the Mouth (08HB045). Graham Creek has records for May through September in 1971, June through December in 1972 and the complete year for 1973 through 1978.

The mean monthly flows and mean annual discharge (MAD) for this station are in the following table.

–  –  –

For the period of record, the mean monthly flow is below 20% of MAD (24 litres/sec) for the period of May through October. Therefore, for the purpose of assessing water supply and demand in the plan area, the low flow period will be May through October. The high flow period will be the remaining months of November through April when the mean monthly flow is above 20% of MAD.

In 1972 there was zero flow for the period of July through October. In 1977 there was zero flow for the period of June through September. The flow records indicate that there has been zero mean monthly flow recorded in the months of June, July, August, September and October. Therefore the flow records indicate that, within the plan area, there is no water supply, from surface flows, for five months of the low flow period during low flow years.

The flows in Graham Creek were used to estimate the mean monthly discharge and mean annual discharge (MAD) in all significant drainages within the Denman and Hornby Islands Allocation Plan area. The estimated flow per unit area for this station are in the following table.

–  –  –

The above flows were multiplied by the watershed area to obtain an estimated MAD and mean monthly flows for each identified significant watershed.

The remaining two hydrometric stations record water levels on Graham Lake on Denman Island (08HB056) and Chickadee Lake on Denman Island (08HB057). The

DENMAN & HORNBY ISLANDS WATER ALLOCATION PLAN

water level records for both stations extend from April through October for 1977 and 1978 and from April through September for 1979 through 1981. A summary of WSC flow records may be found in Appendix B.

In addition to the hydrometric stations, further information related to stream flows and water volumes are available from past site inspections, reports and observations related to water licence applications. Also bathymetric surveys of Graham Lake and Chicadee Lake were completed by Water Management Branch of the Ministry of Environment.

3.3 Streamflow Estimates 3.3.1 Graham Creek The Graham Creek drainage area is 2.69 km2 (1.04 mi2). The hydrometric station on Graham Creek at the Mouth (08HB045) has records for May through September in 1971, June through December in 1972 and the complete year for 1973 through 1978. The mean monthly flows are illustrated in the following figure.

Figure 4: Graham Creek at the Mouth (08HB045) Morrison Swamp is connected directly to Graham Creek and has a surface area of approximately 19.4 ha (47.9 acres). Prior to the construction of McFarlane Ditch, McFarlane Swamp is believed to have been a part of Morrison Swamp.

–  –  –

A bathymetric survey was done by Water Management Branch of the Ministry of Environment in June of 1981. The surface area of Graham Lake is approximately 15.4 ha (38.1 acres) at full supply level and the lake volume is 756 dam3 (613 acft). A copy of the Storage Capacity and Area Curves and the bathometry is in Appendix C.

The water level records indicate that the lake level drops between 0.26 metres (0.84 ft) and 0.40 metres (1.31 ft) from April 1 to the lowest lake level; which occurs from mid-August to mid-September. Net annual evaporation loss from the surface is estimated to be approximately 0.3 metres (1.0 ft).

Cicero Slough is tributary to Graham Lake and has a surface area of approximately 3.0 ha (7.4 acres). The slough was to be dredged to obtain a total volume of water of 59 dam3 (48 acft).

3.3.2 McFarlane Ditch McFarlane Ditch flows from McFarlane Swamp and has a total drainage area of

1.87 km2 (0.72 mi2). McFarlane Swamp as been dammed at the outlet to store water for conservation purposes. Prior to the construction of McFarlane Road and McFarlane Ditch, McFarlane Swamp is believed to have been a part of Morrison Swamp.



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