WWW.SA.I-PDF.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Abstracts, books, theses
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:     | 1 |   ...   | 2 | 3 || 5 | 6 |   ...   | 36 |

«Contents PART ONE 4 Chapter 1 5 Chapter 2 14 Chapter 3 19 Chapter 4 24 Chapter 5 30 Chapter 6 38 Chapter 7 41 Chapter 8 47 PART TWO 58 Chapter 1 59 ...»

-- [ Page 4 ] --

Down in the street the wind flapped the torn poster to and fro, and the word INGSOC fitfully appeared and vanished. Ingsoc. The sacred principles of Ingsoc. Newspeak, doublethink, the mutability of the past. He felt as though he were wandering in the forests of the sea bottom, lost in a monstrous world where he himself was the monster. He was alone. The past was dead, the future was unimaginable. What certainty had he that a single human creature now living was on his side? And what way of knowing that the dominion of the Party would not endure FOR EVER? Like an answer, the three

slogans on the white face of the Ministry of Truth came back to him:

WAR IS PEACE

FREEDOM IS SLAVERY

IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH

He took a twenty-five cent piece out of his pocket. There, too, in tiny clear lettering, the same slogans were inscribed, and on the other face of the coin the head of Big Brother. Even from the coin the eyes pursued you. On coins, on stamps, on the covers of books, on banners, on posters, and on the wrappings of a cigarette packet–everywhere. Always the eyes watching you and the voice enveloping you. Asleep or awake, working or eating, indoors or out of doors, in the bath or in bed–no escape.

Nothing was your own except the few cubic centimetres inside your skull.

The sun had shifted round, and the myriad windows of the Ministry of Truth, with the light no longer shining on them, looked grim as the loopholes of a fortress. His heart quailed before the enormous pyramidal shape. It was too strong, it could not be stormed. A thousand rocket bombs would not batter it down. He wondered again for whom he was writing the diary. For the future, for the past–for an age that might be imaginary. And in front of him there lay not death but annihilation. The diary would be reduced to ashes and himself to vapour. Only the Thought Police would read what he had written, before they wiped it out of existence and out of memory. How could you make appeal to the future when not a trace of you, not even an anonymous word scribbled on a piece of paper, could physically survive?

The telescreen struck fourteen. He must leave in ten minutes. He had to be back at work by fourteenthirty.

Curiously, the chiming of the hour seemed to have put new heart into him. He was a lonely ghost uttering a truth that nobody would ever hear. But so long as he uttered it, in some obscure way the continuity was not broken. It was not by making yourself heard but by staying sane that you carried

on the human heritage. He went back to the table, dipped his pen, and wrote:

To the future or to the past, to a time when thought is free, when men are different from one another

and do not live alone–to a time when truth exists and what is done cannot be undone:

From the age of uniformity, from the age of solitude, from the age of Big Brother, from the age of doublethink–greetings!

He was already dead, he reflected. It seemed to him that it was only now, when he had begun to be able to formulate his thoughts, that he had taken the decisive step. The consequences of every act are

included in the act itself. He wrote:

Thoughtcrime does not entail death: thoughtcrime IS death.

Now he had recognized himself as a dead man it became important to stay alive as long as possible.

Two fingers of his right hand were inkstained. It was exactly the kind of detail that might betray you.

Some nosing zealot in the Ministry (a woman, probably: someone like the little sandy-haired woman or the dark-haired girl from the Fiction Department) might start wondering why he had been writing during the lunch interval, why he had used an old-fashioned pen, WHAT he had been writing–and then drop a hint in the appropriate quarter. He went to the bathroom and carefully scrubbed the ink away with the gritty dark-brown soap which rasped your skin like sandpaper and was therefore well adapted for this purpose.

He put the diary away in the drawer. It was quite useless to think of hiding it, but he could at least make sure whether or not its existence had been discovered. A hair laid across the page-ends was too obvious. With the tip of his finger he picked up an identifiable grain of whitish dust and deposited it on the corner of the cover, where it was bound to be shaken off if the book was moved.

Chapter 3 Winston was dreaming of his mother.

He must, he thought, have been ten or eleven years old when his mother had disappeared. She was a tall, statuesque, rather silent woman with slow movements and magnificent fair hair. His father he remembered more vaguely as dark and thin, dressed always in neat dark clothes (Winston remembered especially the very thin soles of his father’s shoes) and wearing spectacles. The two of them must evidently have been swallowed up in one of the first great purges of the fifties.

At this moment his mother was sitting in some place deep down beneath him, with his young sister in her arms. He did not remember his sister at all, except as a tiny, feeble baby, always silent, with large, watchful eyes. Both of them were looking up at him. They were down in some subterranean place–the bottom of a well, for instance, or a very deep grave–but it was a place which, already far below him, was itself moving downwards. They were in the saloon of a sinking ship, looking up at him through the darkening water. There was still air in the saloon, they could still see him and he them, but all the while they were sinking down, down into the green waters which in another moment must hide them from sight for ever. He was out in the light and air while they were being sucked down to death, and they were down there because he was up here. He knew it and they knew it, and he could see the knowledge in their faces. There was no reproach either in their faces or in their hearts, only the knowledge that they must die in order that he might remain alive, and that this was part of the unavoidable order of things.





He could not remember what had happened, but he knew in his dream that in some way the lives of his mother and his sister had been sacrificed to his own. It was one of those dreams which, while retaining the characteristic dream scenery, are a continuation of one’s intellectual life, and in which one becomes aware of facts and ideas which still seem new and valuable after one is awake. The thing that now suddenly struck Winston was that his mother’s death, nearly thirty years ago, had been tragic and sorrowful in a way that was no longer possible. Tragedy, he perceived, belonged to the ancient time, to a time when there was still privacy, love, and friendship, and when the members of a family stood by one another without needing to know the reason. His mother’s memory tore at his heart because she had died loving him, when he was too young and selfish to love her in return, and because somehow, he did not remember how, she had sacrificed herself to a conception of loyalty that was private and unalterable. Such things, he saw, could not happen today. Today there were fear, hatred, and pain, but no dignity of emotion, no deep or complex sorrows. All this he seemed to see in the large eyes of his mother and his sister, looking up at him through the green water, hundreds of fathoms down and still sinking.

Suddenly he was standing on short springy turf, on a summer evening when the slanting rays of the sun gilded the ground. The landscape that he was looking at recurred so often in his dreams that he was never fully certain whether or not he had seen it in the real world. In his waking thoughts he called it the Golden Country. It was an old, rabbit-bitten pasture, with a foot-track wandering across it and a molehill here and there. In the ragged hedge on the opposite side of the field the boughs of the elm trees were swaying very faintly in the breeze, their leaves just stirring in dense masses like women’s hair. Somewhere near at hand, though out of sight, there was a clear, slow-moving stream where dace were swimming in the pools under the willow trees.

The girl with dark hair was coming towards them across the field. With what seemed a single movement she tore off her clothes and flung them disdainfully aside. Her body was white and smooth, but it aroused no desire in him, indeed he barely looked at it. What overwhelmed him in that instant was admiration for the gesture with which she had thrown her clothes aside. With its grace and carelessness it seemed to annihilate a whole culture, a whole system of thought, as though Big Brother and the Party and the Thought Police could all be swept into nothingness by a single splendid movement of the arm. That too was a gesture belonging to the ancient time. Winston woke up with the word ‘Shakespeare’ on his lips.

The telescreen was giving forth an ear-splitting whistle which continued on the same note for thirty seconds. It was nought seven fifteen, getting-up time for office workers. Winston wrenched his body out of bed–naked, for a member of the Outer Party received only 3,000 clothing coupons annually, and a suit of pyjamas was 600–and seized a dingy singlet and a pair of shorts that were lying across a chair. The Physical Jerks would begin in three minutes. The next moment he was doubled up by a violent coughing fit which nearly always attacked him soon after waking up. It emptied his lungs so completely that he could only begin breathing again by lying on his back and taking a series of deep gasps. His veins had swelled with the effort of the cough, and the varicose ulcer had started itching.

‘Thirty to forty group!’ yapped a piercing female voice. ‘Thirty to forty group! Take your places, please. Thirties to forties!’ Winston sprang to attention in front of the telescreen, upon which the image of a youngish woman, scrawny but muscular, dressed in tunic and gym-shoes, had already appeared.

‘Arms bending and stretching!’ she rapped out. ‘Take your time by me. ONE, two, three, four! ONE, two, three, four! Come on, comrades, put a bit of life into it! ONE, two, three four! ONE two, three, four!…’ The pain of the coughing fit had not quite driven out of Winston’s mind the impression made by his dream, and the rhythmic movements of the exercise restored it somewhat. As he mechanically shot his arms back and forth, wearing on his face the look of grim enjoyment which was considered proper during the Physical Jerks, he was struggling to think his way backward into the dim period of his early childhood. It was extraordinarily difficult. Beyond the late fifties everything faded. When there were no external records that you could refer to, even the outline of your own life lost its sharpness.

You remembered huge events which had quite probably not happened, you remembered the detail of incidents without being able to recapture their atmosphere, and there were long blank periods to which you could assign nothing. Everything had been different then. Even the names of countries, and their shapes on the map, had been different. Airstrip One, for instance, had not been so called in those days: it had been called England or Britain, though London, he felt fairly certain, had always been called London.

Winston could not definitely remember a time when his country had not been at war, but it was evident that there had been a fairly long interval of peace during his childhood, because one of his early memories was of an air raid which appeared to take everyone by surprise. Perhaps it was the time when the atomic bomb had fallen on Colchester. He did not remember the raid itself, but he did remember his father’s hand clutching his own as they hurried down, down, down into some place deep in the earth, round and round a spiral staircase which rang under his feet and which finally so wearied his legs that he began whimpering and they had to stop and rest. His mother, in her slow, dreamy way, was following a long way behind them. She was carrying his baby sister–or perhaps it was only a bundle of blankets that she was carrying: he was not certain whether his sister had been born then. Finally they had emerged into a noisy, crowded place which he had realized to be a Tube station.

There were people sitting all over the stone-flagged floor, and other people, packed tightly together, were sitting on metal bunks, one above the other. Winston and his mother and father found themselves a place on the floor, and near them an old man and an old woman were sitting side by side on a bunk.

The old man had on a decent dark suit and a black cloth cap pushed back from very white hair: his face was scarlet and his eyes were blue and full of tears. He reeked of gin. It seemed to breathe out of his skin in place of sweat, and one could have fancied that the tears welling from his eyes were pure gin. But though slightly drunk he was also suffering under some grief that was genuine and unbearable. In his childish way Winston grasped that some terrible thing, something that was beyond forgiveness and could never be remedied, had just happened. It also seemed to him that he knew what it was. Someone whom the old man loved–a little granddaughter, perhaps–had been killed. Every few

minutes the old man kept repeating:

‘We didn’t ought to ‘ave trusted ‘em. I said so, Ma, didn’t I? That’s what comes of trusting ‘em. I said so all along. We didn’t ought to ‘ave trusted the buggers.’ But which buggers they didn’t ought to have trusted Winston could not now remember.

Since about that time, war had been literally continuous, though strictly speaking it had not always been the same war. For several months during his childhood there had been confused street fighting in London itself, some of which he remembered vividly. But to trace out the history of the whole period, to say who was fighting whom at any given moment, would have been utterly impossible, since no written record, and no spoken word, ever made mention of any other alignment than the existing one. At this moment, for example, in 1984 (if it was 1984), Oceania was at war with Eurasia and in alliance with Eastasia. In no public or private utterance was it ever admitted that the three powers had at any time been grouped along different lines. Actually, as Winston well knew, it was only four years since Oceania had been at war with Eastasia and in alliance with Eurasia. But that was merely a piece of furtive knowledge which he happened to possess because his memory was not satisfactorily under control. Officially the change of partners had never happened. Oceania was at war with Eurasia: therefore Oceania had always been at war with Eurasia. The enemy of the moment always represented absolute evil, and it followed that any past or future agreement with him was impossible.

The frightening thing, he reflected for the ten thousandth time as he forced his shoulders painfully backward (with hands on hips, they were gyrating their bodies from the waist, an exercise that was supposed to be good for the back muscles)–the frightening thing was that it might all be true. If the Party could thrust its hand into the past and say of this or that event, IT NEVER HAPPENED–that, surely, was more terrifying than mere torture and death?

The Party said that Oceania had never been in alliance with Eurasia. He, Winston Smith, knew that Oceania had been in alliance with Eurasia as short a time as four years ago. But where did that knowledge exist? Only in his own consciousness, which in any case must soon be annihilated. And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed–if all records told the same tale–then the lie passed into history and became truth. ‘Who controls the past,’ ran the Party slogan, ‘controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.’ And yet the past, though of its nature alterable, never had been altered. Whatever was true now was true from everlasting to everlasting. It was quite simple. All that was needed was an unending series of victories over your own memory. ‘Reality control’, they called it: in Newspeak, ‘doublethink’.

‘Stand easy!’ barked the instructress, a little more genially.



Pages:     | 1 |   ...   | 2 | 3 || 5 | 6 |   ...   | 36 |


Similar works:

«HOW TO MAKE A BUDGET | USING THE ENVELOPE SYSTEM | PAYCHECK FREQUENCY FAMILIES AND BUDGETS | YOU MAKE IT ALL WORK Contents Introduction How to Make a Budget Using the Envelope System Paycheck Frequency Families and Budgets You Make It All Work Introduction Congratulations! You’ve already started. Started? you may be thinking. What do you mean? We mean that by reading this guide, you’ve taken the most important step toward giving yourself a solid financial future. You are already making...»

«Growth Theory through the Lens of Development Economics Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo Massachusetts Institute of Technology Abstract Growth theory traditionally assumed the existence of an aggregate production function, whose existence and properties are closely tied to the assumption of optimal resource allocation within each economy. We show extensive evidence, culled from the microdevelopment literature, demonstrating that the assumption of optimal resource allocation fails radically....»

«Published articles Oct 2006 June 2008 Tech Book 1 Michael Reed June 2008 Unmusic Books – http://www.unmusic.co.uk/ Unmusic Books http://www.unmusic.co.uk/ This edition 2008 © Michael Reed 2008 Michael Reed asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of this work This is the PDF E-book edition of this book. A print version (ISBN 978-0-9560813-1-5) is also available. See my website for more details. http://www.unmusic.co.uk/ You may redistribute this E-book as long as it is...»

«Development of the Thai bond market Akkharaphol Chabchitrchaidol and Orawan Permpoon 1. Introduction The rebuilding and strengthening of Thailand’s financial sector in the aftermath of the 1997 economic and financial crisis brought to light weaknesses in the country’s financial development. Prior to the financial crisis of 1997, the function of financial intermediation fell almost entirely on commercial banks. They mobilised funds mainly through deposits, which accounted for roughly 80% of...»

«Discussion of “Tax Cuts and Growth: Israel in the 2000s” by Hercowitz and Lifschitz Moshe Hazan Tel Aviv University December 16, 2013 Moshe Hazan ( Tel Aviv University ) December 16, 2013 1/7 General Impression I really enjoyed the paper: It asks a central question in economic policy. It uses a clear and standard model.Qualitatively, the model’s predictions are in accord with the data: acceleration in labor supply coupled with a deceleration of the real wage. Moshe Hazan ( Tel Aviv...»

«BROWARD COUNTY MANAGEMENT & EFFICIENCY STUDY COMMITTEE MARCH 2, 2000 MEMBERS Stephanie Pearson, Chair PRESENT: Phyllis Berry Honorable Darla Carter Commissioner Scott Cowan Samuel Fields, Esq. Dan Lewis Honorable Fred Lippman Vice Mayor Carlton Moore Paul Tanner MEMBERS Senator Howard Forman ABSENT: Donald Giancoli Karen Mintz Margulies Robert H. Miller Anthony A. Nolan Lisa K. Aronson, Executive Director STAFF PRESENT: Bobbie M. Sewell, Assistant Administrator Norm Ostrau, Esq., Deputy County...»

«F770 – Fall 2014 – Page 1 of 9 F770 Financial Economics and Quantitative Methods Fall 2014 Course Outline Finance and Business Economics DeGroote School of Business McMaster University COURSE OBJECTIVE This course explores the theoretical and conceptual foundations of finance. It seeks to explain the decisions taken by various participants of the financial markets, the pricing of financial instruments, and various observed market phenomena. INSTRUCTOR AND CONTACT INFORMATION Dr. Clarence...»

«HANDOUT: SARS Examples of Money Laundering Investigations Fiscal Year 2015 Page 1 of 13 Examples of Money Laundering Investigations Fiscal Year 2015 The following examples of Money Laundering Investigations are written from public record documents on file in the courts within the judicial district where the cases were prosecuted. Car Dealer Sentenced for Money Laundering On May 27, 2015, in Buffalo, New York, Jerry Robbins, of Cheektowaga, was sentenced to 63 months in prison. Robbins was...»

«WO R K I N G PA P E R S E R I E S N O 17 2 2 / A U G U S T 2014 HOW DO HOUSEHOLDS ALLOCATE THEIR ASSETS? STYLISED FACTS FROM THE EUROSYSTEM HOUSEHOLD FINANCE AND CONSUMPTION SURVEY Luc Arrondel, Laura Bartiloro, Pirmin Fessler, Peter Lindner, Thomas Y. Mathä, Cristiana Rampazzi, Frederique Savignac, Tobias Schmidt, Martin Schürz and Philip Vermeulen HOUSEHOLD FINANCE AND CONSUMPTION NETWORK In 2014 all ECB publications feature a motif taken from the €20 banknote. NOTE: This Working Paper...»

«Majid et. al. ♦ Information Needs and Seeking Behaviour Information Needs and Seeking Behaviour of Business Students*. Shaheen Majid, Iftikah Hayat, Rashna Phiroze Patel and Srivatson Vijayaraghavan Nanyang Technological University Abstract Information needs and seeking behavior of library users are changing due to several factors such as availability of information in multiple formats, new information discovery and delivery channels particularly mobile devices, changes in scholarly...»

«The Local Government Finance Series, Volume I The Local Property Tax in Tennessee Prepared by: Harry A. Green, Ph.D. Executive Director Stan Chervin, Ph.D. Consultant (Principal Author) Cliff Lippard Director of Fiscal Affairs (Project Management and Design and Principal Editor) Other TACIR Staff Contributors Linda Joseph Publications Assistant ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff of the TACIR wish to acknowledge the assistance of Mr. Ed Young, consultant, and Ms. Kim Robertson, former TACIR publication...»

«Tony S. Wirjanto CURRICULUM VITA PERSONAL INFORMATION Name: Tony S. Wirjanto.Affiliation: (1) School of Accounting & Finance (SAF), Faculty of Arts, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1. (2) Department of Statistics & Actuarial Science (SAS), Faculty of Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1. Position: (1) Full Professor at SAF (2) Full Professor at SAS (3) University Research Chair (2009-2015) Telephone Number: (519) 888-4567 ext. 35210. Fax...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2017 www.sa.i-pdf.info - Abstracts, books, theses

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.