WWW.SA.I-PDF.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Abstracts, books, theses
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:     | 1 | 2 || 4 | 5 |   ...   | 36 |

«Contents PART ONE 4 Chapter 1 5 Chapter 2 14 Chapter 3 19 Chapter 4 24 Chapter 5 30 Chapter 6 38 Chapter 7 41 Chapter 8 47 PART TWO 58 Chapter 1 59 ...»

-- [ Page 3 ] --

That was all, and he was already uncertain whether it had happened. Such incidents never had any sequel. All that they did was to keep alive in him the belief, or hope, that others besides himself were the enemies of the Party. Perhaps the rumours of vast underground conspiracies were true after all–perhaps the Brotherhood really existed! It was impossible, in spite of the endless arrests and confessions and executions, to be sure that the Brotherhood was not simply a myth. Some days he believed in it, some days not. There was no evidence, only fleeting glimpses that might mean anything or nothing: snatches of overheard conversation, faint scribbles on lavatory walls–once, even, when two strangers met, a small movement of the hand which had looked as though it might be a signal of recognition. It was all guesswork: very likely he had imagined everything. He had gone back to his cubicle without looking at O’Brien again. The idea of following up their momentary contact hardly crossed his mind. It would have been inconceivably dangerous even if he had known how to set about doing it. For a second, two seconds, they had exchanged an equivocal glance, and that was the end of the story. But even that was a memorable event, in the locked loneliness in which one had to live.

Winston roused himself and sat up straighter. He let out a belch. The gin was rising from his stomach.

His eyes re-focused on the page. He discovered that while he sat helplessly musing he had also been writing, as though by automatic action. And it was no longer the same cramped, awkward handwriting as before. His pen had slid voluptuously over the smooth paper, printing in large neat capitals–

DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER

DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER

DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER

DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER

DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER

over and over again, filling half a page.

He could not help feeling a twinge of panic. It was absurd, since the writing of those particular words was not more dangerous than the initial act of opening the diary, but for a moment he was tempted to tear out the spoiled pages and abandon the enterprise altogether.

He did not do so, however, because he knew that it was useless. Whether he wrote DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER, or whether he refrained from writing it, made no difference. Whether he went on with the diary, or whether he did not go on with it, made no difference. The Thought Police would get him just the same. He had committed–would still have committed, even if he had never set pen to paper– the essential crime that contained all others in itself. Thoughtcrime, they called it. Thoughtcrime was not a thing that could be concealed for ever. You might dodge successfully for a while, even for years, but sooner or later they were bound to get you.

It was always at night–the arrests invariably happened at night. The sudden jerk out of sleep, the rough hand shaking your shoulder, the lights glaring in your eyes, the ring of hard faces round the bed. In the vast majority of cases there was no trial, no report of the arrest. People simply disappeared, always during the night. Your name was removed from the registers, every record of everything you had ever done was wiped out, your one-time existence was denied and then forgotten. You were abolished, annihilated: VAPORIZED was the usual word.

For a moment he was seized by a kind of hysteria. He began writing in a hurried untidy scrawl:

theyll shoot me i don’t care theyll shoot me in the back of the neck i dont care down with big brother they always shoot you in the back of the neck i dont care down with big brother—He sat back in his chair, slightly ashamed of himself, and laid down the pen. The next moment he started violently. There was a knocking at the door.

Already! He sat as still as a mouse, in the futile hope that whoever it was might go away after a single attempt. But no, the knocking was repeated. The worst thing of all would be to delay. His heart was thumping like a drum, but his face, from long habit, was probably expressionless. He got up and moved heavily towards the door.

Chapter 2 As he put his hand to the door-knob Winston saw that he had left the diary open on the table.

DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER was written all over it, in letters almost big enough to be legible across the room. It was an inconceivably stupid thing to have done. But, he realized, even in his panic he had not wanted to smudge the creamy paper by shutting the book while the ink was wet.

He drew in his breath and opened the door. Instantly a warm wave of relief flowed through him. A colourless, crushed-looking woman, with wispy hair and a lined face, was standing outside.

‘Oh, comrade,’ she began in a dreary, whining sort of voice, ‘I thought I heard you come in. Do you think you could come across and have a look at our kitchen sink? It’s got blocked up and—-’ It was Mrs Parsons, the wife of a neighbour on the same floor. (‘Mrs’ was a word somewhat discountenanced by the Party–you were supposed to call everyone ‘comrade’–but with some women one used it instinctively.) She was a woman of about thirty, but looking much older. One had the impression that there was dust in the creases of her face. Winston followed her down the passage.





These amateur repair jobs were an almost daily irritation. Victory Mansions were old flats, built in 1930 or thereabouts, and were falling to pieces. The plaster flaked constantly from ceilings and walls, the pipes burst in every hard frost, the roof leaked whenever there was snow, the heating system was usually running at half steam when it was not closed down altogether from motives of economy.

Repairs, except what you could do for yourself, had to be sanctioned by remote committees which were liable to hold up even the mending of a window-pane for two years.

‘Of course it’s only because Tom isn’t home,’ said Mrs Parsons vaguely.

The Parsons’ flat was bigger than Winston’s, and dingy in a different way. Everything had a battered, trampled-on look, as though the place had just been visited by some large violent animal. Games impedimenta–hockey-sticks, boxing-gloves, a burst football, a pair of sweaty shorts turned inside out–lay all over the floor, and on the table there was a litter of dirty dishes and dog-eared exercisebooks. On the walls were scarlet banners of the Youth League and the Spies, and a full-sized poster of Big Brother. There was the usual boiled-cabbage smell, common to the whole building, but it was shot through by a sharper reek of sweat, which–one knew this at the first sniff, though it was hard to say how–was the sweat of some person not present at the moment. In another room someone with a comb and a piece of toilet paper was trying to keep tune with the military music which was still issuing from the telescreen.

‘It’s the children,’ said Mrs Parsons, casting a half-apprehensive glance at the door. ‘They haven’t been out today. And of course—-’ She had a habit of breaking off her sentences in the middle. The kitchen sink was full nearly to the brim with filthy greenish water which smelt worse than ever of cabbage. Winston knelt down and examined the angle-joint of the pipe. He hated using his hands, and he hated bending down, which was always liable to start him coughing. Mrs Parsons looked on helplessly.

‘Of course if Tom was home he’d put it right in a moment,’ she said. ‘He loves anything like that.

He’s ever so good with his hands, Tom is.’ Parsons was Winston’s fellow-employee at the Ministry of Truth. He was a fattish but active man of paralysing stupidity, a mass of imbecile enthusiasms–one of those completely unquestioning, devoted drudges on whom, more even than on the Thought Police, the stability of the Party depended. At thirtyfive he had just been unwillingly evicted from the Youth League, and before graduating into the Youth League he had managed to stay on in the Spies for a year beyond the statutory age. At the Ministry he was employed in some subordinate post for which intelligence was not required, but on the other hand he was a leading figure on the Sports Committee and all the other committees engaged in organizing community hikes, spontaneous demonstrations, savings campaigns, and voluntary activities generally.

He would inform you with quiet pride, between whiffs of his pipe, that he had put in an appearance at the Community Centre every evening for the past four years. An overpowering smell of sweat, a sort of unconscious testimony to the strenuousness of his life, followed him about wherever he went, and even remained behind him after he had gone.

‘Have you got a spanner?’ said Winston, fiddling with the nut on the angle-joint.

‘A spanner,’ said Mrs Parsons, immediately becoming invertebrate. ‘I don’t know, I’m sure. Perhaps the children—-’ There was a trampling of boots and another blast on the comb as the children charged into the living-room. Mrs Parsons brought the spanner. Winston let out the water and disgustedly removed the clot of human hair that had blocked up the pipe. He cleaned his fingers as best he could in the cold water from the tap and went back into the other room.

‘Up with your hands!’ yelled a savage voice.

A handsome, tough-looking boy of nine had popped up from behind the table and was menacing him with a toy automatic pistol, while his small sister, about two years younger, made the same gesture with a fragment of wood. Both of them were dressed in the blue shorts, grey shirts, and red neckerchiefs which were the uniform of the Spies. Winston raised his hands above his head, but with an uneasy feeling, so vicious was the boy’s demeanour, that it was not altogether a game.

‘You’re a traitor!’ yelled the boy. ‘You’re a thought-criminal! You’re a Eurasian spy! I’ll shoot you, I’ll vaporize you, I’ll send you to the salt mines!’ Suddenly they were both leaping round him, shouting ‘Traitor!’ and ‘Thought-criminal!’ the little girl imitating her brother in every movement. It was somehow slightly frightening, like the gambolling of tiger cubs which will soon grow up into man-eaters. There was a sort of calculating ferocity in the boy’s eye, a quite evident desire to hit or kick Winston and a consciousness of being very nearly big enough to do so. It was a good job it was not a real pistol he was holding, Winston thought.

Mrs Parsons’ eyes flitted nervously from Winston to the children, and back again. In the better light of the living-room he noticed with interest that there actually was dust in the creases of her face.

‘They do get so noisy,’ she said. ‘They’re disappointed because they couldn’t go to see the hanging, that’s what it is. I’m too busy to take them. and Tom won’t be back from work in time.’ ‘Why can’t we go and see the hanging?’ roared the boy in his huge voice.

‘Want to see the hanging! Want to see the hanging!’ chanted the little girl, still capering round.

Some Eurasian prisoners, guilty of war crimes, were to be hanged in the Park that evening, Winston remembered. This happened about once a month, and was a popular spectacle. Children always clamoured to be taken to see it. He took his leave of Mrs Parsons and made for the door. But he had not gone six steps down the passage when something hit the back of his neck an agonizingly painful blow. It was as though a red-hot wire had been jabbed into him. He spun round just in time to see Mrs Parsons dragging her son back into the doorway while the boy pocketed a catapult.

‘Goldstein!’ bellowed the boy as the door closed on him. But what most struck Winston was the look of helpless fright on the woman’s greyish face.

Back in the flat he stepped quickly past the telescreen and sat down at the table again, still rubbing his neck. The music from the telescreen had stopped. Instead, a clipped military voice was reading out, with a sort of brutal relish, a description of the armaments of the new Floating Fortress which had just been anchored between Iceland and the Faroe Islands.

With those children, he thought, that wretched woman must lead a life of terror. Another year, two years, and they would be watching her night and day for symptoms of unorthodoxy. Nearly all children nowadays were horrible. What was worst of all was that by means of such organizations as the Spies they were systematically turned into ungovernable little savages, and yet this produced in them no tendency whatever to rebel against the discipline of the Party. On the contrary, they adored the Party and everything connected with it. The songs, the processions, the banners, the hiking, the drilling with dummy rifles, the yelling of slogans, the worship of Big Brother–it was all a sort of glorious game to them. All their ferocity was turned outwards, against the enemies of the State, against foreigners, traitors, saboteurs, thought-criminals. It was almost normal for people over thirty to be frightened of their own children. And with good reason, for hardly a week passed in which ‘The Times’ did not carry a paragraph describing how some eavesdropping little sneak–‘child hero’ was the phrase generally used–had overheard some compromising remark and denounced its parents to the Thought Police.

The sting of the catapult bullet had worn off. He picked up his pen half-heartedly, wondering whether he could find something more to write in the diary. Suddenly he began thinking of O’Brien again.

Years ago–how long was it? Seven years it must be–he had dreamed that he was walking through a pitch-dark room. And someone sitting to one side of him had said as he passed: ‘We shall meet in the place where there is no darkness.’ It was said very quietly, almost casually–a statement, not a command. He had walked on without pausing. What was curious was that at the time, in the dream, the words had not made much impression on him. It was only later and by degrees that they had seemed to take on significance. He could not now remember whether it was before or after having the dream that he had seen O’Brien for the first time, nor could he remember when he had first identified the voice as O’Brien’s. But at any rate the identification existed. It was O’Brien who had spoken to him out of the dark.

Winston had never been able to feel sure–even after this morning’s flash of the eyes it was still impossible to be sure whether O’Brien was a friend or an enemy. Nor did it even seem to matter greatly.

There was a link of understanding between them, more important than affection or partisanship. ‘We shall meet in the place where there is no darkness,’ he had said. Winston did not know what it meant, only that in some way or another it would come true.

The voice from the telescreen paused. A trumpet call, clear and beautiful, floated into the stagnant

air. The voice continued raspingly:

‘Attention! Your attention, please! A newsflash has this moment arrived from the Malabar front.

Our forces in South India have won a glorious victory. I am authorized to say that the action we are now reporting may well bring the war within measurable distance of its end. Here is the newsflash—-’ Bad news coming, thought Winston. And sure enough, following on a gory description of the annihilation of a Eurasian army, with stupendous figures of killed and prisoners, came the announcement that, as from next week, the chocolate ration would be reduced from thirty grammes to twenty.

Winston belched again. The gin was wearing off, leaving a deflated feeling. The telescreen–perhaps to celebrate the victory, perhaps to drown the memory of the lost chocolate–crashed into ‘Oceania, ‘tis for thee’. You were supposed to stand to attention. However, in his present position he was invisible.

‘Oceania, ‘tis for thee’ gave way to lighter music. Winston walked over to the window, keeping his back to the telescreen. The day was still cold and clear. Somewhere far away a rocket bomb exploded with a dull, reverberating roar. About twenty or thirty of them a week were falling on London at present.



Pages:     | 1 | 2 || 4 | 5 |   ...   | 36 |


Similar works:

«ISLAMIC DEVELOPMENT BANK ISLAMIC RESEARCH AND TRAINING INSTITUTE Habib Ahmed Research Paper No.59 ISLAMIC DEVELOPMENT BANK ISLAMIC RESEARCH AND TRAINING INSTITUTE Habib Ahmed Research Paper No.59 © ISLAMIC DEVELOPMENT BANK ISLAMIC RESEARCH AND TRAINING INSTITUTE King Fahd National Library Cataloging-in-Publication Data Ahmed, Habib A Microeconomic Model of an Islamic Bank. Jeddah. 40 pages;17 X 24 cm. ( Research paper ; 59 ) ISBN: 9960-32-124-x 1Islamic economy 2Microeconomy ITitle IISeries...»

«Market Planning for Value-Added Agricultural Products by Lynda Brushett & Gregory Franklin This workbook is based on presentations by Lynda Brushett, Niche Marketing, Barrington, NH, Greg Franklin, Gregory S. Franklin Associates, Lebanon, NH and Jim Miller, Miller Business Navigators, Canterbury, NH for the Marketing U Seminar on Market Planning For Value-Added Agricultural Products held at East Hill Farm in Troy NH, January 26 & 27, 2000. Project management by Jean Conklin and John Porter, UNH...»

«Financing Geothermal Energy July 2013 EGEC Policy Paper Financing Geothermal Energy Contents Key Messages Introduction 1. Geothermal technologies and costs 1.1 Geothermal electricity 1.2 Geothermal heating and cooling 1.3 Economics of geothermal technologies 2. Financial barriers & needs 2.1 Geothermal project financing 2.2 Mechanism for funding 3. Existing mechanisms for funding at EU and national level 3.1 Research, Development & Deployment 3.2 National geothermal risk insurance 3.3 Financial...»

«INDIAN INSTITUTE OF BANKING & FINANCE (An ISO 9001 2008 CERTIFIED ORGANISATION) Kohinoor City, Commercial-II, Tower-1, 2nd Floor, Kirol Road, Kurla (West), Mumbai 400 070 Web-site : www.iibf.org.in DIPLOMA IN BANKING & FINANCE Rules & Syllabus ABOUT THE DIPLOMA There will be a growing demand for qualified manpower for the banking and finance sector in the coming years on account of expansion of volume of business and large scale retirement of personnel. Banking and finance industry will require...»

«Finance/Economics I developed financial awareness from an early age. My mother, who was unfortunately widowed when I was young, taught me the crucial importance of monitoring outgoings and ensuring they were always proportionate to income. When the international media exposed the true extent of the financial crisis, I was left puzzled and curious to discover how supposedly practical banks run by expert financiers in economically developed countries could possibly have racked up multi-billion...»

«Local Government Ethics Law State of New Jersey Year of Service: 2013 Department of Community Affairs Financial Disclosure Statement * The Year that you are filing Division of Local Government Services the statement This Financial Disclosure Statement is required annually of all local government officers Local Finance Board in accordance with N.J.S.A. 40A:9-22.1 et seq., the Local Government Ethics Law. 61a3138d-8795-4730-a7bb-0f250c9c37cb Enter the Local Government Served: Millstone Township...»

«Convention of the Highlands and Islands Elgin, Moray Monday 5 October 2015 Present Ministers: John Swinney MSP, Deputy First Minister and Cabinet Secretary for Finance, Constitution & Economy Derek Mackay MSP, Minister for Transport & Islands Roseanna Cunningham MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Fair Work, Skills and Training Richard Lochhead, Constituency MSP, Moray Members Amanda Bryan Forestry Commission Scotland John Mason Scottish Government Alex Paterson Highlands and Islands Enterprise Lorne...»

«FOUNDATIONS OF THE STATE IN THEORY AND PRACTICE: READING BREMER AND THE COUNTERINSURGENCY FIELD MANUAL by Roger B. Myerson, November 2007 http://home.uchicago.edu/~rmyerson/research/fieldman.pdf Abstract. Paul Bremer's book about Iraq and the US Army's Counterinsurgency Field Manual express theories about the foundations of the state. Bremer emphasizes the primary importance of a national constitution. The Field Manual emphasizes local security operations and effective governance to establish...»

«CRIME PREVENTION AND THE COSTS OF AUTO THEFT: AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS by Simon Field Home Office Research and Planning Unit, London Abstract* The total cost of auto theft to the U.S. in 1985 is estimated at $6 billion at current prices, or about $45 per automobile per year. On the basis of this estimate, it is calculated that it would be cost-effective for society to invest a few hundred dollars per car in built-in security to prevent auto theft. In practice, there is very little incentive for...»

«Lending to Innovative Firms: The Role of Lender Expertise and Control Rights∗ Sudheer Chava Vikram Nanda Steven Chong Xiao Georgia Tech Georgia Tech Georgia Tech September 2013 ∗ Sudheer Chava can be reached at Scheller College of Business at the Georgia Institute of Technology, 800 W. Peachtree St NW, GA 30309-1148; Phone: 404-894-4371; Email: sudheer.chava@scheller.gatech.edu. Vikram Nanda can be reached at Scheller College of Business at the Georgia Institute of Technology, 800 W....»

«FISCAL MULTIPLIERS Arbresh MAMUDI, State University of Tetovo, Geoff PUGH, Staffordshire University Business School ABSTRACT The prevalent view on the stabilization role of fiscal policy has evolved over time. The theory on the effectiveness of fiscal policy on output stabilization is controversial and indeterminate. The empirical evidence is huge reporting heterogeneous results: the range of empirical findings varies from negative to higher than one.We apply MRA analysis to a set of 65...»

«Journal of Markets & Morality Volume 11, Number 2 (Fall 2008): 239–253 Copyright © 2008 Milton Friedman Julio H. Cole on Income Professor of Economics Universidad Francisco Marroquín Inequality Guatemala There is a certain tension in Milton Friedman’s views on the issue of freedom versus equality, which was much more nuanced than is commonly assumed. On the one hand, he argued that economic policy should focus on freedom as a primary value; stressing equality per se could lead to economic...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2017 www.sa.i-pdf.info - Abstracts, books, theses

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.